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ArtikelIs protein intake associated with bone mineral density in young women?  
Oleh: Beasley, Jeannette M ; Ichikawa, Laura E ; Ange, Brett A ; Spangler, Leslie ; LaCroix, Andrea Z
Jenis: Article from Journal - ilmiah internasional
Dalam koleksi: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition vol. 91 no. 05 (May 2010), page 1311-1316 .
Topik: protein; bone mineral density
Ketersediaan
  • Perpustakaan FK
    • Nomor Panggil: A07.K.2010.01
    • Non-tandon: 1 (dapat dipinjam: 0)
    • Tandon: tidak ada
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Isi artikelBackground: The range of protein intakes for optimizing bone health among premenopausal women is unclear. Protein is a major constituent of bone, but acidic amino acids may promote bone resorption. Objective: The objective was to examine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between baseline dietary protein and bone mineral density (BMD) among 560 females aged 14–40 y at baseline enrolled in a Pacific Northwest managed-care organization. The role of protein source (animal or vegetable) and participant characteristics were considered. Design: Dietary protein intake was assessed by using a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire in participants enrolled in a study investigating associations between hormonal contraceptive use and bone health. Annual changes in hip, spine, and whole-body BMD were measured by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between baseline protein intake (% of energy) and BMD were examined by using linear regression analysis and generalized estimating equations adjusted for confounders. Results: The mean (±SD) protein intake at baseline was 15.5 ± 3.2%. After multivariable adjustment, the mean BMD was similar across each tertile of protein intake. In cross-sectional analyses, low vegetable protein intake was associated with a lower BMD (P = 0.03 for hip, P = 0.10 for spine, and P = 0.04 for whole body). For every percentage increase in the percentage of energy from protein, no significant longitudinal changes in BMD were observed at any anatomic site over the follow-up period. Conclusions: Data from this longitudinal study suggest that a higher protein intake does not have an adverse effect on bone in premenopausal women. Cross-sectional analyses suggest that low vegetable protein intake is associated with lower BMD.
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